UK heatwave returns? Britain to bake in 10 days as scorching new system barrels near

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Blistering hot weather could still return to the country before the end of the month, some forecasters have claimed. The UK has been battered by heavy rain and thunderstorms over the past few weeks as low-pressure weather systems continue to sweep across much of Britain. But, one forecaster, Channel 4 News weatherman, Liam Dutton, has suggested a “typhoon over Asia may bring summer weather back to the UK in around 10 days”.

The Met Office’s long-range forecast also suggests settled conditions could return to the UK towards the end of the month and at the start of September.

Mr Dutton posted a video on Twitter, showing how a weather system currently impacting Asia could bring improved conditions to the UK in just under two weeks.

The video reads: “Tropical storm Krosa is spinning around over the northwest Pacific Ocean.

“It was previously a typhoon but has now weakened to a strong tropical storm.

“During the next few days, it will move over Japan and onwards to the far east of Russia.

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“However, it will also bump into the jet stream high up in the atmosphere.

“This will send a ripple eastwards along the jet stream, like what happens when you flick a skipping rope.

“If you look closely, you can see this ripple in the jet stream travel across the ocean to the US.

“The ripple then travels onwards to above the Atlantic Ocean, pushing the jet stream north of the UK.

“If the jet stream moves north of the UK, it will bring high pressure instead of low pressure.

“High pressure would bring settled weather for the end of August with some sunshine and a warmer feel than of late.”

Over the past week, the UK has been rattled by a series of low-pressure weather systems which have brought heavy rain and thunderstorms to the British Isles.

But, the Met Office long-range forecast has also suggested conditions could become more settled for the south of the country towards the end of the month.

The forecast for Sunday, August 18 to Tuesday, August 27, reads: “The unsettled theme looks set to continue this weekend, with low-pressure systems affecting the UK.

“Sunshine and showers will be likely for many on Sunday, with the risk of thunderstorms and coastal gales.

“Into next week, there will be brighter and showery interludes across the UK.

“It will be windy too, with gales at times, especially in the north and west at first. Any drier spells are likely to be brief through this period.

“Through next week and towards the end of August, there are some signs that longer drier and more settled spells may occur, especially in the south.

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“Temperatures will often be below normal for the time of year, and there will be some chilly nights during any quieter spells.”

But, the long-range forecast which looks at the start of September, suggests “there are tentative signs that high pressure could become more dominant across the UK”.

It reads: “Temperatures are likely to fluctuate, although will be around normal for the time of year.

“There will be the chance of some more lengthy warm spells developing, although confidence is low throughout this period.”

Despite more settled conditions possible towards the end of the month, leading bookmakers have slashed odds on this month going down the wettest on record.

Alex Apati of Ladbrokes said: “It looks as though summer is well and truly over with August set to be a complete washout.”

The UK is bracing for more unsettled weather on Wednesday as rain sweeps across much of the country.

The Met Office even has a yellow thunderstorm warning in place for much of the Midlands, between 2pm to 10pm on Wednesday.

The warning reads: “Although many places will miss them, heavy showers and thunderstorms may affect parts of the area through Wednesday afternoon, before slowly dying out during the evening. A few spots could see as much as 25mm in an hour, and perhaps 40mm in two or three hours.”

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