Storm Hannah unearths 'sunken' forest from more than 4,500 years ago

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Storm Hannah is believed to have uncovered a ‘drowned’ forest from more than 4,500 years ago.

The forest of Borth used to stretch for two to three miles along the shore between Ynys-las and Borth in Wales, before it was buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater.

Now, after low tides and a storm, the prehistoric forest of hundreds of trees has been revealed on the beach.

Massive thick trunks, sprawling roots and much more of the trees can be seen for the first time in thousands of years.

Locals think it’s the most of the forest ever to have been uncovered and speculate Storm Hannah dug out the roots, now revealed by a lower than usual tide.

The forest of Borth used to stretch for two to three miles

Massive thick trunks can be seen for the first time in thousands of years

 

Amateur photographer Wayne Lewis, 38, from Welshpool was walking on the beach when he spotted the uncovered beach.

He said: “The trees really are stunning. 

“It’s breathtaking that these trees were part of a Bronze Age forest that extended almost to Ireland, but have not been seen for thousands of years. 

“It first emerged in 2014, but was then partially recovered, and usually you are only able to see the tips of the tree stumps. 

“It seems it has been uncovered again recently.

“I don’t know for sure, but it is probably due to a combination of ‘Storm Hannah’ with the 80mph winds last month, and the tides have been very low, making more of the forest visible.”

The prehistoric forest of hundreds of trees has been revealed

The forest has become associated with the myth of a sunken civilization

 

Archaeologists knew the Bronze Age forest existed on the beach because small stumps were sometimes visible along parts of it at low tide.

In 2014, shin-high stumps were visible for the first time, but locals said they were soon mostly recovered by sand.

Experts have found the submerged forest contains pine, alder, oak and birch.

The tides have been very low, making more of the forest visible

The skeletal trees have led to the local legend of a lost kingdom – called Cantre’r Gwaelod – which folklore says drowned beneath the waves.

It is understood the trees stopped growing between 4,500 and 6,000 years ago, as the water level rose and a thick blanket of peat formed.



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